The Do’s and Don’ts of Dating in Recovery

This advice does not pertain to individuals who are already in relationships, only those who are unattached. One year can sound like a long time, especially for those who enjoy companionship. However, this wisdom is built on the experience of millions of recovering people. It can also take their attention away from the emotional, mental, and physical work required for a full and lasting recovery. For example, some people seek out new relationships so they can enjoy the thrills of the honeymoon period. But, what happens when this year passes and you meet someone who is ready to date?

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Updated on February 11th, If your partner is in a program of recovery, some good guidelines would be making sure you sit down and discuss how you both will prioritize your own recovery. Meaning, which meetings you will attend together, which will you go to by yourselves, and what do your sponsors say about this partnership. The biggest downfall of this type of relationship is people can often make each other their recovery.

However, the benefit of this relationship is both parties, if working a program of recovery, are honest, open-minded, and willing to do what is suggested. Those in recovery programs are said to be constantly taking inventories, listening to feedback, and working on bettering themselves every day.

In recovery, addicts can find good health, self-awareness, and peace. It can be tempting to jump into a new relationship during this time of.

When you first start dating in recovery, it is normal to feel completely scared and confused — after all, where is all that liquid courage? Here we take you through the best steps to getting back out on the scene while ensuring that you do not relapse in the process. Dating in addiction recovery can often lead to relapse if you are not ready for what lies ahead.

From the abundance of strong emotions at the beginning of a relationship, to the emotional turmoil experienced during a breakup, dating can often cause a person to put their recovery on the back burner, or worse — experience a relapse. This is why it is often recommended that you wait at least a full year before starting to date in recovery. Many experts in addiction treatment strongly encourage their clients to wait at least one year before beginning a new relationship. The first year of addiction recovery is a vital time when your sobriety should be in the absolute forefront and will take all of your focus and energy.

It is also a time when recovering addicts are starting to rediscover themselves. The early stages of recovery are spent figuring out who you are without drugs and alcohol, rebuilding your own sense of self-worth and self-esteem, and re-learning how to cope with stressors of everyday life. If you do meet someone special within the first year of recovery, taking it slowly and being honest that your sobriety is the most important factor in your life is crucial.

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The idea of sober dating may seem like a scary proposition. Or, that someone will not accept someone who knows their own limits and their own body at this level. We live in a culture of more is better, so dating a recovering person will introduce a significant other to a higher level of self-awareness and self-care.

Dating a recovering addict is challenging. Learn how to maintain a relationship with an addict in recovery & how to cope with dating someone.

After undergoing treatment for addiction, sobriety comes with a sense of relief. Recovery is a long and complex process. It requires diligence and commitment to staying sober. Outside of rehabilitation, the support of friends and family plays a huge role in keeping loved ones accountable. Recovering from addiction is often a slow and deliberate process. There are many things that can help simplify trying to stay sober.

The first year of recovery can often be the most vulnerable. Introducing new romantic relationships during this process can sometimes be tumultuous. Is dating during recovery recommended?

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Going through addiction and entering treatment will significantly change your world view, so everyday human social interactions are also bound to be approached differently in recovery, especially something like dating. During treatment, you worked on understanding how to hone your coping skills to help rebuild your life, and you are still working on those aspects every day in recovery.

This can open you up to ideas of dating or connecting with others in a new way. So far, you have been trying to surround yourself with only positive and encouraging people, and when presented the opportunity to date someone who fits this description, you may be tempted to jump right in. However, entering a romantic relationship should be a deliberate decision, not an impulsive one.

A lot can change due to drug and alcohol addiction, and successful rehabilitation entails rebuilding a person’s life. When it comes to relationships, the realities.

The editorial staff of Rehabs. Our editors and medical reviewers have over a decade of cumulative experience in medical content editing and have reviewed thousands of pages for accuracy and relevance. Recovery is a time for self-care and reflection, establishing structure and controlling urges. Most weeks, Saturday nights are spent at 12 step meetings. To be clear, no professional would ever recommend dating in early recovery.

But, we have to be realistic and look at cases individually. Whether you are single and getting sober, or recovery is a part of your relationship, here are some tips to help you date smarter and safer. Recovery is an ongoing process of self-discovery.

Dating in Early Recovery

Dating these days is tough. They are kind, thoughtful, funny and responsible. Deciding to enter into a committed relationship with someone is not a decision to make lightly, especially if that someone is in recovery. Instead, assess the points mentioned above. Your email address will not be published. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

After undergoing treatment for addiction, sobriety comes with a sense of relief. Recovery is a long and complex process. It requires diligence.

For many, this means dating. But is looking for a new relationship, or just playing the field, in early recovery a wise thing to do? As with any other aspect of addiction and recovery, everyone is different. That means you may not be in the best place to judge who would be a suitable partner. A break-up can trigger anger or depression, which can prompt you to want desperately to self-medicate. Remember that your number-one priority is getting well and you need to focus on yourself for this period.

Do you trust yourself again?

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Focus on getting to know each other as people before rushing into a physically intimate relationship. It takes time for the brain and body to adjust to living a sober life. You can be a source of love, encouragement, and support, but the decision to remain in recovery belongs to your partner alone. If your attraction is based on a desire to rescue someone in need, you may be suffering from codependency. This condition is characterized by an excessive emotional, physical, and psychological reliance on another person to boost your own self-esteem.

Codependent relationships are not healthy for either partner.

​Fortunately, dating without the use of drugs and alcohol is possible. Julie Banter​ is a recovering alcoholic and a Recovery Support Specialist at our women’s.

Here are some tips to get you started on the road to a healthy relationship with a recovering addict. Take time to really understand the full spectrum of where the person is in their recovery. During the beginning phase of recovery, he or she is still adjusting mentally, physically, and emotionally to their new life without drugs or alcohol. Are they in contact with a sponsor? Finally, understand that this person may have done things that led to serious consequences before getting sober.

They may have financial debt or have a DUI and are therefore unable to drive. Consider all these issues before beginning a serious relationship. You can also go to support groups for families and friends of recovering addicts. By attending these meetings, you can get advice and support from people in similar circumstances and find out even more about addiction recovery. Be supportive and never make your new partner feel guilty about spending time attending meetings or keeping other recovery-related appointments.

Be considerate of your partner when planning dates.

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